Video offers tips for parents and families this Eating Disorder Awareness Week

Video offers tips for parents and families this Eating Disorder Awareness Week

Video show ways to support neurodiverse children and young people. Research shows autistic people may be more likely to experience an eating disorder.

An Oxford Health animation is full of tips and tricks for parents and families supporting neurodiverse children and young people struggling with their diet and eating.

Research suggests that autistic people may be more likely to experience an eating disorders.

This Eating Disorder Awareness Week we are sharing easy pointers for families to help them support children and young people diagnosed with autism and attention deficit and hyper activity disorder (ADHD).

The animation is part of a five-part series – How do I help? – full of tips for parents and families to understand the common challenges their children experience and learn strategies to help themIt has been produced by the Oxfordshire Child and Adolescent Mental Health (CAMHS) Oxford Neurodevelopment Conditions (NDC) team at Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust.

Dr Shah Tarfarosh, the former Specialist Registrar in Psychiatry with the Oxfordshire CAMHS neurodevelopmental conditions team, was behind the project. He said: “Autistic young people and young people with ADHD can find some everyday experiences challenging. Every neurodiverse person is an individual, and therefore like anyone their experiences and challenges are different. However, we know that for many young people and their families things like mealtimes are common areas where families face challenges.

“The experiences portrayed in the animations reflect the real-life experiences of children, young people and families who use the service. Real-life practical strategies are mentioned in an animated story format to help parents of neurodiverse children manage common experiences they face at home.”

Watch the videos on YouTube.

And tell us what you think.

To find out more about Oxfordshire Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service’s neurodiversity pathway team.

Published: 2 March 2022