Research trials

Take part in research now

There are opportunities to take part in many of the studies listed below. Contact us at mentalhealthresearch@oxfordhealth.nhs.uk to register your interest and we will be in touch.

Children and Young People

CLASP-ID The aim of this study is to improve the diagnosis of anxiety in ID services, with a focus on validating this tool for children and young adults who have limited communication.

OPTYC is designed to evaluate an Internet-delivered Cognitive Therapy (iCT) programme for the treatment of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in adolescents. The study will run an early stage trial to provide feasibility data on acceptability, compliance, retention, and delivery; and to provide exploratory point estimates of the effect sizes (and confidence intervals) of iCT on the primary and secondary endpoints relative to a Waiting List (delayed treatment) condition (WL).

SIB This study targets risk markers implicating causal mechanisms, specifically impulsivity and poor sleep, which drive the development, severity, and timing of self-injury. These risk markers present viable preventative intervention targets for children with autism and ID.

Mood disorders

PREFER is a questionnaire study to establish patient preferences for voice-hearing therapies. There are lots of different types of psychological (talking) therapies for the experience of hearing distressing voices. However, there hasn’t been any research about patient preferences for these therapies. The PREFER study aims to find out more about patient preferences, including where you think therapy should take place, what you think therapy should involve and what you think therapy should focus on and try to help with. The study aims to help clinicians and researchers to develop and offer therapies that better match with the patients’ preferences.

PAX-BD is a study to find out if pramipexole is a beneficial treatment to patients with bipolar disorder who have depression that has not responded to other treatments. To do this we are looking for around 290 patients with bipolar disorder who are currently depressed, from up to 40 different mental health trusts across the UK to take part.

LQD aims to compare the clinical and cost effectiveness of lithium versus quetiapine when used as add-on therapies to antidepressant medication for patients with Treatment Resistant Depression (TRD). Participation involves pre-screening questions usually delivered over the phone. Following this a full screening and baseline assessment will be completed (this involves completing study questionnaires and having blood samples and physical observations taken). Participants are then randomised to either lithium or quetiapine. A research assistant will then meet with the participant at 8, 26 and 52 weeks to complete further questionnaires and blood tests. Participants also complete weekly True Colours self-rated questionnaires.

TACK II invites patients and mental health professionals to assess the effectiveness of DIALOG+, an app developed for clinicians working with patients with depression. The study is a randomized controlled trial, where clinicians will either work with patients using the DIALOG+ app, or follow usual care. This new approach has already been found to improve the quality of life of people with psychosis and we are hoping that patients with depression may experience similar benefits

Dementia

PATHFINDER Problem Adaptation Therapy (PATH) is a new form of talking therapy for people with mild-moderate dementia and depression. PATH aims to help people with Alzheimer’s disease and their carers to find ways that they can change their environment and activities so that they can enjoy a more positive state of mood. PATHFINDER is a randomised-control trial evaluating the effectiveness of the PATH intervention using a newly adapted manual. Participants are randomly allocated to either 12 weeks of the modified PATH treatment or current treatment offered as usual within the NHS. Outcomes are measured at 0, 3, 6 and 12 months. The most important outcome is improvement in symptoms of depression at 6 months.

Perinatal Studies

CAPRI-Voc invites mothers who have experienced serious mental illness with infants aged between 9-18 months to explore different brain patterns of babies whose mums have experienced mental illness. The aim is to examine how the brain of infants processes voices and to understand how different factors may affect a child’s responses to sounds and voices.

Psychosis and schizophrenia

PREFER is a questionnaire study to establish patient preferences for voice-hearing therapies. There are lots of different types of psychological (talking) therapies for the experience of hearing distressing voices. However, there hasn’t been any research about patient preferences for these therapies. The PREFER study aims to find out more about patient preferences, including where you think therapy should take place, what you think therapy should involve and what you think therapy should focus on and try to help with. The study aims to help clinicians and researchers to develop and offer therapies that better match with the patients’ preferences.

Alkermes intends to investigate if olanzapine and samidorphan (ALK 3831) can allow patients to have the benefits of olanzapine without the associated weight gain and metabolic risks.

BI is a study assessing the effectiveness of a clinical trial medication. The medication has been developed to improve cognitive function in patients with Schizophrenia. Patients are invited to participate in a Computerised Cognitive Training program alongside taking the medication.

SCENE looks to develop new ways of supporting patients to improve their social networks and wellbeing. Patients with psychosis are invited to take part in a randomised controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness of working with a Social Coach for 6 months. Participants are invited to three follow up appointments over an 18-month period to assess wellbeing.

Hearing Nasty Voices is a study which is looking to understand why people can find their auditory hallucinations difficult to ignore or dismiss. Participants who experience voices that are critical and/or derogatory will complete a set of questionnaires online or on paper and receive £5 on completion.

PPIP2 is a pilot study that aims to test enough patients with psychosis to be able to define the prevalence of schizophrenia that is caused by an antibody mediated disorder. Participation involves a blood sample and permission to store the sample for future testing. Participants receive £10 reimbursement for their time.

Urban Mind is a study looking at whether we can use smartphone-based experience sampling – which involves participants logging their experiences into their smartphone – to predict risk of future psychotic relapse at the level of the individual?

Biogen While therapies exist to address some symptoms of schizophrenia, there are currently no approved medicines for the cognitive impairment associated with this condition. The TALLY clinical trial aims to understand if an investigational medication could be safe and potentially effective in impacting attention and memory in people living with cognitive impairment associated with schizophrenia (CIAS).

STAR Trial is a randomised controlled trial which will test whether a talking therapy focusing on managing common effects of trauma can help people make sense of past events and how it affects them now. It aims to help people find new ways of dealing with difficult memories, experiences and feelings.

Non-urgent advice: Learn more

To find out more about any of these studies, please email:

mentalhealthresearch@oxfordhealth.nhs.uk

Page last reviewed: 21 September, 2021