The following are some examples of the work that is underway. Other projects are in development and further updates will be added below as work progresses.

COVID-19 and mental health – evidence based guidance

A team led by Professor Andrea Cipriani have summarised the best available guidance around the key questions facing mental health clinicians every day. The guidance covers a range of topics and may be of use to patients as well as those treating them. You can read the full guidance here including translations into other languages.

Guidance and resources for trauma after intensive care

Researchers led by Professor Anke Ehlers have published new guidelines and provided free resources for treating patients experiencing Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) following admission to an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) during the COVID-19 pandemic. The resources are available here. You can read more about the work here.

Supporting NHS therapists and frontline staff

The same team have also provided direct support to IAPT (Improving Access to Psychological Therapies) services and other clinicians by developing guidance for remote working with patients. They have held three live webinars for NHS England to support IAPT therapists treating PTSD remotely. Recordings of the webinars are available.

Social isolation and lockdown – a study of the effects on adolescents in Oxfordshire

A new study partly funded by the BRC will determine current risks to adolescents from isolation, during the COVID-19 crisis. In partnership with researchers, schools in Oxfordshire can agree to take part in the study for pupils aged 9 to 18 years (Years 5 to 13). Read more about the study here.

Excessive mistrust linked to conspiracy beliefs reduces the following of government coronavirus guidance

A study led by Professor Daniel Freeman and funded by Oxford Health BRC has indicated that a disconcertingly high number of adults in England do not agree with scientific and governmental information on the the coronavirus pandemic. Read the full story here.

Supporting mental health and resilience in first responders

The COVID-19 pandemic has put unprecedented pressure on our emergency services, highlighting the vital need to build resilience and protect the mental health of first responders. New analysis by Dr Jen Wild, Oxford Health BRC Senior Fellow, recommends that a combination of operational training for staff and mental health training for managers is most effective. Read the full story here.

Visit the Oxford Health BRC website for more information about our research.